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  #61  
Old 06-10-2012, 09:23 PM
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Agua Hedionda Lagoon's Watersports Evolution
By Wendy Hinman
A history of Agua Hedionda Lagoon's innovative heyday


The sun rises over Evans Point and scatters silver across the quiet waters of Agua Hedionda’s back bay. A muffled boat floats out onto the glassy stillness and with a thumbs up from a skier on the dock, it hits the gas, breaks the calm and another perfect summer day begins on Carlsbad’s busiest lagoon. The memories of such days are as steady as the water lapping the shore as the sun sinks low and hulls are rinsed off at end of day.

This summer it is wave runners and wakeboarders out for fun, but in the ’60s it was water skiers on wooden skis and the ’70s and ’80s added Jet skiers. According to a kid who grew up on the lagoon, there was a time between Fox’s Snug Harbor and Whitey’s Landing (near Bristol Cove) when each were putting about 100 boats a day in the water.

From the air it looked like a Where’s Waldo drawing. So in the early ’60s, Harry Walton and Ed Urbanski, a couple of Carlsbad’s finest under Police Chief Max Polkowski, were sent out on lagoon patrol. “Our first boat was a 36-foot landing craft we got from Army surplus for $500,” Walton said. We used it for a year and sold it to the City of San Diego. They put it in Miramar lake (reservoir) and it sank. Our second boat was a 24-foot Captain’s gig, also from Army surplus.” The water police objective? “To keep everyone going counter-clockwise.”

Only one or two citations would be written on any given weekend, but Walton said, “It was terrible. I’d go through a full first-aid kit every Saturday and Sunday and we’d send three or four people to the emergency room.” Here is where Walton said his 15 minutes of fame came. Walton thought a flag—similar to the ones divers used—might work instead of the skier raising his hand. The observer in the boat would raise the red flag to signal a down skier.

Did it work? Soon the higher-ups were concerned. Walton said, “The Division of Small Craft Harbors came down to see why we weren’t sending accident reports anymore.” Always on the cutting edge, Carlsbad passed a city ordinance requiring use of the flag in 1960. The State of California caught up later and now the flag is standard practice for skiers and wakeboarders.

Another Carlsbad innovation was a small, flat, bottom speedboat designed by the Litchfield brothers. Outboards would be ousted from the lagoon and drag races would ensue. Walton said they could reach 100 mph sometimes. It is hard to imagine that without anyone hitting the mud flats, but low on the water, they were a thing of powerful beauty.

For all the action in the water Rusty Sharman said, “John Fox ran the landing like a ship. He’d wear Navy dress whites and ring bells every hour. He was quite a character.” Walton said of Fox, “He was an ex-Navy chief” and the American flag went up in the morning and down in the evening punctually and ceremoniously.

Before Carlsbad High School offered surfing or beach volleyball for P.E., it offered water skiing as a summer school class. Many students began the summer with a wobbly, double ski start and ended with a single ski dock start. The teacher and boat driver was the newly elected city councilman, Bud Lewis.

The biggest problem with water skiing has always been the need for driver and skier to read each other’s minds. It’s hard to holler over an Evinrude. What if the skier could drive himself? Or, as Clayton Jacobsen II conceptualized, what if you could motorcycle on water? Jacobsen made a prototype Jet Ski of aluminum by 1965. Instead of an outboard he went inboard with an internal pump-jet and later made the hull out of fiberglass. By the early ’70s Jacobsen had sold the patent to Kawasaki with Jet Ski becoming its official name. Kawasaki needed to do some R & D and needed a water-filled laboratory.

Meanwhile, back at the lagoon, Rusty Sharman grew up a stone’s throw from the water, “next to the Fox’s house.” His dad had a bait shop at the landing. Dave and Rolf Sammons came with their dad who raced speedboats. (Fox eventually sold the landing and then Fred and Lee Lathrop took up the lease from its LA owner). They had fished the lagoon, driven boats, skied, kneeboarded and tinkered with engines at water’s edge. Cindy Lathrop said, “It was a family place. I remember gathering around the fire ring after skiing all day. January 1 was a big day with polar bear patches. Weekends would be packed with trailers all the way up the hill. Geez, I think I skied before I could run. I remember my dad running along the beach pulling me.”

When Kawasaki arrived with its prototypes, they found willing test pilots in these 12- and 13-year-olds. They would ride for gas and Kawasaki would pepper them with questions that Sharman said were “mostly about improvements and safety issues. They ran a pretty extensive test program. I remember one guy whose sole job was to test the stretch on rubber belts,” after a few hours in the water.

A few years into it, Kawasaki’s white-coats rented a ballroom in an Oceanside hotel and invited “about 10 families who frequented the lagoon to come and answer questions.” Sharman remembers that there were families so often at the lagoon they became a sort of extended family. “There were the Lathrops, of course, and the Whiteings, the Cockrans—Randy Cockran was the first paid test-rider—the Egdahls, the Westes, the Leiths, the Turners.” And Cindy Lathrop was not a bad Jet skier for a girl!

Kawasaki came out with its first model in 1973 to limited production. It was a stand-up with a 400cc, two-stroke engine. They came out with a mass production, JS400-A, in 1976. Not only did these kids help Kawasaki successfully develop this new recreational vehicle, but the Jet Ski helped develop some of their futures.

Something in a man wants to take anything that is plain fun and make a competition out of it. As the Jet Ski became commercially successful, Jet Ski races began to spring up in our lagoon and beyond. The Sammons, Sharman, Brian Bendix and those who didn’t realize they’d been practicing were set to take the field.

“It was like a moto-cross track in the water,” Sharman said. He made the All Southern California team sponsored by Snug Harbor Ski Hut. Dave Sammons said there were different races: “Stock and modified skis, and in the early days there were weight classes.” Both big boys and standouts for the CHS wrestling team, they both added Jet Ski accolades next to their wrestling trophies. “The first Jet Ski race was at Mission Bay in 1977. The first race in Carlsbad was at the harbor in ‘78,” he said.

But Jet Ski racing, like NASCAR, is a team effort. When the weight classes were dropped they became mechanics on the crew. Along with Brian Bendix and his brother Rolf, Sammons said, “Those were some good days. We traveled all over the country.” In the early ’80s Transworld Recreation had taken over the landing and Sammons was on their team until he started his own company. Dave’s passion was in how the engines worked. He designed the first fuel injector for the Jet Ski.

Jacobsen designed both a stand-up and sit-down version of the Jet Ski initially. He had originally tried to sell his idea to Bombardier (a snowmobile maker, Ski Doo to Sea Doo) as a sit-down. When that didn’t pan out, he went to Kawasaki with the stand-up. The stand-up design is more difficult to master, but when it became commercially successful, Kawasaki, Yamaha and others began marketing various designed personal watercraft (PWC). They also upped the power. Kawasaki’s latest is the Jet Ski Ultra 250x, with a 250 horsepower, four-stroke, supercharged engine.

Jet Ski racing reached its zenith by the late ’80s. Sharman said, “For some reason, as the sit-downs became more successful, racing declined.” There are still Jet Ski races, but nothing on the scale of those early days. Sharman remembers the Olympic Long Beach Marine Stadium packed with spectators. Or one world final in Lake Havasu. “There were 1000 Jet Skis all started at once and the smoke was almost unbearable.” That smoke has also stalled the sport. Many areas only allow clean running, late model PWC. Stand-ups can still be ridden in California, but can no longer be sold in California.

While most guys were racing Jet Skis, Randy Laine was sneaking one under the freeway, the train trestle, 101 and out into the open ocean. Laine was a surfer and he had to get the thing out into the waves. He rode, crashed and jumped the waves at Tamarack. He was an innovator of tow-in surfing and freestyle Jet Skiing. Like freestyle snow skiing, this is not a first-guy-over-the-line event; it is a judged event. The winner catches more air and demonstrates more insanity—with technique—than the second place finisher. Laine’s nickname in this world is “Father of Freeriding.” (Check out clickoncarlsbad.com’s editorial features for Laine’s entire story).

Laine is still sponsored in this extreme sport. Sammons still builds engines for folks in his garage. Sharman works for North County Jet Ski. It has been rumored that Tony Finn, a pioneer of wakeboarding in the ’90s was sighted a time or two on his “Skurfer” at Snug Harbor. But the halcyon days for the lagoon were those three decades of the ’60s to the ’80s. Some have said insurance and permit laws cut into the fun. Some say rules and strictures have squeezed the PWC industry. Whatever the reason, an era seems to have past. “Those were magical days,” Sharman mused. “There are a lot of great memories down there,” Sammons said. “It was a unique place for awhile,” Walton sighed, then added, “When the sun went down and the water glassed off, it was the most wonderful water skiing in the world.”

Engines and equipment have surely changed, but Agua Hedionda has not. Jet Skis can still be rented. Wakeboarding can be learned. Innovations are waiting. The sunrise still spills silver across the surface and the wind dies every evening leaving the stillness lingering with possibilities. •



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  #62  
Old 06-10-2012, 11:08 PM
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Old 06-11-2012, 12:56 AM
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Imperial Beach Pollutant Transport and Dilution Experiment (IB09)

Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Experiment Motivation

California beaches are culturally, economically, and ecologically important. Significant health risks and economic losses are associated with bacterial pollution at California beaches. Recent improvements in treatment and disposal have reduced coastal pollution from offshore sewage outfalls, and contamination in many urban locations during dry weather is primarily runoff that drains directly onto the beach, or from tidal flushing of contaminated creeks and estuaries. The transport and mixing of these pollutants by ocean waves, currents, and tides are poorly understood.
The goal of the proposed Imperial Beach Pollutant Transport and Dilution Experiment (IB09), is improved understanding and modeling capability of breaking wave-driven transport and mixing of pollutants in the nearshore at alongshore distances of up to O(5-10 km) from a surfzone source. The focus is on dry-weather conditions, when the Tijuana River flow is very small, and beach usage is maximum. Increased understanding of surfzone transport and dilution of observed tracer (dye and chlorophyll) concentrations will allow improved modeling of the fate of pollutants discharged directly into the surfzone.

Experiment Products

A tested and calibrated surfzone tracer dilution model will be an important tool for managing beach closures in California. The wave-driven dilution and transport measurements will be enhanced with an intensive biological sampling program in order to better understand the physical and biological dynamics governing bacterial and phytoplankton patchiness in the shallow nearshore waters. Wave and current nowcasts of the experiment site will also be tested and numerical model predictions for the region will be available through the Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP) web site for use by beach managers, sanitation districts, and county health agencies.

Experiment Site

The experiment site is on and offshore of Imperial Beach between the Tijuana River to the south and the Silver Strand to the north (Figure 1), a site selected for its long straight coastline and a history of water quality problems.

Surfzone Experiment Schedule

The experiment will take place from about September 8, 2009 through October 31, 2009. Deployment of the fixed instrument cross-shore array will begin September 9, 2009 and will take approximately 7-10 days. Data collection will last for approximately 1 month. Retrieval of the instruments will take about 1 week depending on wave conditions.

Experiment Description

The mixing and transport of pollutants by breaking wave-driven process will be studied through a series of dye tracer experiments. Dye released at selected locations at the shoreline under different wave conditions will be carried by the prevailing alongshore currents to form a plume (Figure 2). Wave, current, tracer, bathymetric, and biological measurements, obtained with instruments and techniques described below, will be used to track the plume and rate at which it widens and dilutes. During south swell conditions (i.e., northward dominated currents) dye will be released just north of the Tijuana River mouth. During north swell events (i.e., southward currents) dye will be released at the northern limit of the experiment site south of the Silver Strand State Beach.
Non-toxic Rhodamine WT, the most recommended dye for use in groundwater, lake, and ocean work, will be used in all dye work. Dye quantities and concentration levels used during the experiment will conform to the safety guidelines recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency. (Additional information at: http://www.turnerdesigns.com/t2/doc/appnotes/998_5104.html http://pubs.usgs.gov/twri/twri3-a12/html/pdf.html)
Fixed Instruments:
Cross-shore Array of Fixed Instruments:
Pressure sensors, temperature sensors, current meters, and fluorometers (measuring fluorescence from dye or chlorophyll) will be mounted on tripod frames anchored to the sea bottom on a cross-shore transect between the shoreline and about 5-m depth (Figure 3). The cross-shore array of tripod frames will be located offshore of Imperial Beach Blvd. These instruments will remain at this fixed location for the duration of the experiment.
Stand-alone Fixed Instruments:
Four to six stand-alone fluorometers attached to pipes or poles anchored to the sea bottom will deployed in the surfzone at various alongshore positions during dye experiments. These instruments will be monitored during operation, and removed after each dye experiment.
Dye released several kilometers updrift of the cross-shore array will be carried by the wave-driven alongshore current towards the fixed instruments.
Instrument locations will be marked by fiberglass poles and/or flags that protrude above the water surface (Figure 3). Warning signs will be posted along the shoreline onshore of the instrumented area.
Jetski Sampling System:
A unique jetski sampling system (Figure 4) has been developed based on an existing jetski bathymetry surveying system. The sampling jetski includes GPS (global positioning system) to fix the jetski location, a boom with two water intakes (at 20 and 60 cm depths) for sampling, and sensors for measuring temperature, conductivity, turbidity, and fluorescence (dye or chlorophyll concentrations). This new sampling system allows near-synoptic surface maps of the sampled properties to be produced in the nearshore region and across dye or river plumes. The jetski can sample at speeds of 4-5 m/s.
Profiling Wirewalkers and Upward-looking Acoustic Doppler Conductivity Profilers (ADCP):
Two continuously profiling wirewalkers (CTD+F, currents) and ADCPs will be moored in 10-15 m water depth. Continuous measurements of the currents, temperature, salinity, and chlorophyll fluorescence structure at these locations will provide insight into the internal wave field and subsurface chlorophyll gradients.
Small Boat Surveys:
Daily small boat surveys will map current, temperature, depth, fluorescence, and nitrate on cross- shore sections between the shoreline and about 40 m depth.
Bottle Sampling:
In-situ water samples will be collected throughout the experiment at the shoreline and offshore using a small boat. Water samples will be filtered and chlorophyll extracted in acetone, and whole water samples will be preserved in formalin for laboratory enumeration and taxonomic identification of phytoplankton genera.
Surfzone Drifters:
During the dye studies approximately 15 surfzone drifters (Figure 5) will be repeatedly released/retrieved/reseeded along the 6 km long experiment site. The drifters follow the water, and will be used to measure the surfzone circulation. The drifters are harmless to bathers and surfers.
Beach and Bathymetric surveys:
Surveys of the beach and offshore bathymetry out to about 8 m depth will be made using various in situ survey instrumentation (Figure 6) as described below.
All Terrain Vehicle Surveys
Sub-aerial beach sand level surveys from the back beach to the waterline will be conducted at low tide with a GPS-equipped all terrain vehicle (ATV). ATV surveys are made by driving on alongshore-oriented (parallel to the shoreline) transects spaced about 10 m apart. ATV surveys need to be conducted at low tide which may occur at night.
Jetski Surveys
A Jetski equipped with a GPS and Sonic Depth Finder will be used to survey the underwater bathymetry seaward of the surfzone to about 8 m depths. Surveys will be conducted at high tide and are made by driving the Jetski on cross-shore oriented (perpendicular to the shoreline) transects spaced about 100 m apart. Jetski surveys are conducted when waves are low (< 3-4 feet) and are never conducted at night.
Dolly Surveys
Surveys of the beach from the waterline to about waist deep water are made using a hand-pushed GPS-equipped Dolly.

Past Experience

We have successfully conducted nearshore experiments with in-the-water instrumentation at Torrey Pines State Beach (1977, 1996), San Onofre State Beach (1993), La Jolla Shores Beach (2000, 2001, 2002), Scripps Beach (numerous times), Blacks Beach (2003), and Duck, North Carolina (numerous times), and most recently at Huntington State Beach (2006). Additionally, since April 2001 we have been conducting regular all-terrain-vehicle (monthly) and Jetski (quarterly) sand level surveys at numerous sites in San Diego County (e.g., San Onofre, Camp Pendleton, Cardiff, Solana Beach, Torrey Pines Beach, and Tijuana River Estuary). In each case, we have cooperated with, and received cooperation from State Parks and City staff and lifeguards. In each case, we have completely removed all traces of the experiment when it is over.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography Principal Investigators

R. T. Guza
Falk Feddersen
P. J. S. Franks
William O’Reilly

Funding Agencies

National Science Foundation California Sea Grant California Department of Boating & Waterways

Logistics and Outreach Coordinator

Dr. Michele Okihiro
Scripps Institution of Oceanography
9500 Gilman Drive
La Jolla, CA 92093-0214


(858)246-0094 (phone)
(858)455-5575 (fax)
mokihiro@ucsd.edu


Figure 1. Experiment Site
Figure 2. Dye Plume
Fgure 3. Cross-shore Array
Figure 4. Jetski Tracer Sampling Platform Figure
5. Surfzone Drifters
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  #64  
Old 11-18-2012, 07:06 PM
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Shawn Alladio receiving the Partnership Award from Virgil Chambers of the National Safe Boating Council at the IBWSS conference


K38 Training with USMC Recon Marines at Coronado. Yamaha Waveventure, Shawn Alladio operator










Shawn Alladio, IJSBA Water Safety Director managing the course marshal training in 2009


2010, K38's founder Shawn Alladio inducted into the United States - National Safe Boating Council Boating Safety Hall of Fame at the International Boating and Water Safety Summit in 2011 at San Dieog CA


Shawn Alladio 2010, Kawasaki ULTRA LX Jetski



Steve Strickland, the 'Grandfather of the Sport' loads up new Kawasaki Ultra LX watercraft for K38 Water Safety at Kawasaki headquarters in Irvine, California. K38 enjoys support from Kawasaki with 8 Jetskis annually. This does not include support for K38 functions for charities, rides or other support services rendered on behal of others. K38 has trained thousands of RWC operators worldwide.
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Old 11-19-2012, 03:40 PM
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Grand Theft Auto 5, shows a stylized Honda Aquatrax patterned off of California State Lifeguards RWC in video action
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  #66  
Old 11-19-2012, 03:41 PM
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Where were you in 1973 and how old were you? This is the beginning of the Jetski performance ride! It all started in North County San Diego California!


A truly historical jetski document! This is the Kawasaki dealer letter from Don Graves, KMC sales manager to Lee Lathrop. Snug Harbor was the epicenter of the jetski world. It retains a historical account of the 'ground zero for jetskiing'.

1973 - Jet Ski Sales team for KMC out of Grand Prairie.
Larry Montague, Assistant Sales MANAGER
Don Graves, Sales Manager
Joe McNeill, Regional Advertising and Public Relations Manager
Virgil Davenport, Service Technician
Fred Tunstall, Parts and Service Coordinator
Steve Stricklin, Demonstration Rider
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Old 11-19-2012, 03:47 PM
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Rescue Board Development

The first towable device behind a stand up jetski for lifeguarding in California in the 1970's was a piece of indoor/outdoor carpeting riveted to the stern tray of a standup.

One of the original concepts for a PWC Rescue Board out of Hawai'i. Here is another example of Hawai'ian ingenuity for lifesaving applications that derived from PWC use. In California likewise lifeguards were taking body boards, fire rescue personnel were using river boards and paddleboards cut down and tether with line to the stern deck of PWC's.

At this time the type of PWC's available were Wavejammers & Yamaha Waverunner III models. These boats were small, 601cc engines that were considered 3 seater craft. These Waverunners barely carried 2 people proficiently and required a greater deal of body trim adjustments for turning.

The stern deck of a Waverunner III had about 3" off of its transom to drop the top end of a rescue board onto. It also had a through hull opening that line could easily be threaded through for the rescue devices being dragged behind them.
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  #68  
Old 11-19-2012, 04:06 PM
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K38 SPAIN


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Old 11-19-2012, 04:21 PM
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Shawn Alladio of K38 Water Safety receives the Higgins and Langley Memorial commendation award in 2006 for recovery efforts conducted in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, Louisiana September 2005





Shawn Alladio receiving the Chair Award from Virgil Chambers of the NSBC
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Old 11-19-2012, 04:30 PM
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